Advanced CheckSum Verifier - MD5 and SFV checksum utility for Windows home
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Advanced CheckSum Verifier - MD5 and SFV checksum utility for Windows
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Message Digest number 5 (MD5)

The MD5 (Message Digest number 5) algorithm generate a unique, 128-bit cryptographic message digest value derived from the contents of input stream. This value is considered to be a highly reliable fingerprint that can be used to verify the integrity of the file's contents. If as little as a single bit value in the file is modified, the MD5 checksum for the file changes. Forgery of a file in a way that causes MD5 to generate the same result as that for the original file is considered to be extremely difficult.

A set of MD5 checksums for critical system, application, and data files provides a compact way of storing information for use in periodic integrity checks of those files.

Details for the MD5 cryptographic checksum algorithm and C source code are provided in RFC 1321. The MD5 algorithm has been implemented in numerous computer languages including C, Perl, and Java.

The Advanced CheckSum Verifier is an Windows GUI utility, which generates and verifies message digests (digital signatures) using the MD5 algorithm. This program can be useful when necessary verifying of data burned to CD-R(W), transmitted over network, or for file comparison, and detection of file corruption and tampering.

History of MD5 as described in the RSA Laboratories Crypto FAQ.

MD2, MD4, and MD5 are message-digest algorithms developed by Rivest. They are meant for digital signature applications where a large message has to be "compressed" in a secure manner before being signed with the private key. All three algorithms take a message of arbitrary length and produce a 128-bit message digest. While the structures of these algorithms are somewhat similar, the design of MD2 is quite different from that of MD4 and MD5. MD2 was optimized for 8-bit machines, whereas MD4 and MD5 were aimed at 32-bit machines. Description and source code for the three algorithms can be found as Internet RFCs 1319-1321.

MD2 was developed by Rivest in 1989. The message is first padded so its length in bytes is divisible by 16. A 16-byte checksum is then appended to the message, and the hash value is computed on the resulting message. Rogier and Chauvaud have found that collisions for MD2 can be constructed if the calculation of the checksum is omitted. This is the only cryptanalytic result known for MD2.

MD4 was developed by Rivest in 1990. The message is padded to ensure that its length in bits plus 64 is divisible by 512. A 64-bit binary representation of the original length of the message is then concatenated to the message. The message is processed in 512-bit blocks in the Damgard/Merkle iterative structure, and each block is processed in three distinct rounds. Attacks on versions of MD4 with either the first or the last rounds missing were developed very quickly by Den Boer, Bosselaers and others. Dobbertin has shown how collisions for the full version of MD4 can be found in under a minute on a typical PC. In recent work, Dobbertin (Fast Software Encryption, 1998) has shown that a reduced version of MD4 in which the third round of the compression function is not executed but everything else remains the same, is not one-way. Clearly, MD4 should now be considered broken.

MD5 was developed by Rivest in 1991. It is basically MD4 with "safety-belts" and while it is slightly slower than MD4, it is more secure. The algorithm consists of four distinct rounds, which has a slightly different design from that of MD4. Message-digest size, as well as padding requirements, remains the same. Den Boer and Bosselaers have found pseudo-collisions for MD5. More recent work by Dobbertin has extended the techniques used so effectively in the analysis of MD4 to find collisions for the compression function of MD5. While stopping short of providing collisions for the hash function in its entirety this is clearly a significant step. For a comparison of these different techniques and their impact the reader is referred to.

Van Oorschot and Wiener have considered a brute-force search for collisions in hash functions, and they estimate a collision search machine designed specifically for MD5 (costing $10 million in 1994) could find a collision for MD5 in 24 days on average. The general techniques can be applied to other hash functions.

What is Advanced CheckSum Verifier (ACSV)?

The Advanced CheckSum Verifier is an small, GUI-driven Windows checksum utility intended for creation and verification the checksum files both in SFV and MD5SUM formats. ACSV will help Windows users to protect the integrity of their files by using the CRC32 or MD5 checksum calculation algorithms.

ACSV will useful when necessary to verify the accuracy of files burned to CD-R(W) or transmitted over network, or for files comparison, or for detection of corrupted or tampered files. Adding an little checksum file to your data files will allow easily to verify their integrity at any time in further and allow you to reveal what files has been changed.

ACSV is especially effective if you have many files, many subdirectories, or both. And it's extremely fast and lightweight.

ACSV uses checksum files fully compatible with popular md5 utility for MD5 and SFV (Simple File Verification) for CRC32.

Read more about ACSV
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